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SUMMARY.

While proofing the final edits for this book, yet another needless heartbreak story hit the news.

An out-of-state couple drove their rental Jeep down a seldom traveled road in February into one of southern Utah's famous National Monuments-a road that even locals considered barely passable in the best of weather.

As they were simply on a day trip, they brought with them no extra clothing, gear, or food other than a packet of Skittles candy and some sunflower seeds. They told no one where they were going and when they expected to return and drove past the open visitor center to the monument.

Hours later, a snow storm buried their Jeep up to the frame, transforming their day trip into a six-day wilderness survival episode. The 26-year-old male was discovered sunburned, wet, and stumbling down a road by local ranchers. His 27-year-old female companion died of hypothermia. Due to a classic case of lack of preparation, one more family mourns the untimely death of a loved one.



No one plans plans to find him or herself in a survival situation. That's part of what makes survival situations so terrifying. While there are no guarantees in life, let alone in the wild world of survival, advance preparation for any outdoor excursion is priceless. to find him or herself in a survival situation. That's part of what makes survival situations so terrifying. While there are no guarantees in life, let alone in the wild world of survival, advance preparation for any outdoor excursion is priceless.

The verbosity in this book doesn't mean diddly unless you practice what has been preached, although I'm in no way insinuating that you must become a survival psycho in order to make it out alive.

I realize that you might eliminate certain survival-kit components and add others specific to your needs, and I encourage you to do so. Don't carry what you don't believe in!

Although this ma.n.u.script is cram-packed with technical detail, always remember the sacred art of simplicity. As with most anything involving nature, regardless of prior training, common sense will carry you far. The wilderness is not for you or against you, she just "is" and it's your job as a survivor to adapt to her. If you find yourself in a life-threatening emergency, calm yourself the best that you can, consider your options, and TRY. Your life is precious. As long as you're warm to the touch and have breath in your lungs, never give up and always remember to "Party On!"

16.

THE AMAZING.

"THE DRAWINGS AND PHOTOS ARE REALLY COOL BUT I'M TOO LAZY TO READ.

THIS BOOK" CLIFF NOTES 1. Statistically speaking, what will kill you first in the outdoors is your core body temperature becoming too cold (hypothermia) or too hot (hyperthermia). Watch the weather before your trip, and be prepared for extremes.2. The two easiest ways to regulate body temperature in hot and cold weather are adequate clothing and water. Pack extra clothes and stay hydrated!3. As part of your preparation before before heading into the outdoors, leave a game plan with two people you trust, which can be forwarded to Search and Rescue personnel if needed. This game plan should clearly state, in as much detail necessary, heading into the outdoors, leave a game plan with two people you trust, which can be forwarded to Search and Rescue personnel if needed. This game plan should clearly state, in as much detail necessary, where where you are going, you are going, when when you will return, you will return, who who is in your party, what you are driving, and is in your party, what you are driving, and why why you are taking the trip. Stick to the plan you create! you are taking the trip. Stick to the plan you create!4. Make sure the transportation you use is in good working order and contains emergency gear.5. Have on your person a quality survival kit relevant to the environment and know how to use it.6. Know how to signal for rescue quickly and efficiently.7. Don't take unnecessary chances, rest often, calm down, and maintain a "Party On" attitude!!

If it's COLD outside Reduce heat loss: get out of the wind, off the cold ground, and remove wet clothing. Reduce heat loss: get out of the wind, off the cold ground, and remove wet clothing. Put on dry, insulative clothing and seek or make shelter. Pay special attention to protecting your head, neck, and torso. Build a fire if necessary. Gather extra wood for the night. Drink your water (hot if possible with a few dissolved hard candies or sugar). Clear urine means your body has enough water. Eat high-energy foods (carbohydrates) throughout the day. Get familiar with your area and "make camp" early before it gets dark. Rest and conserve your energy unless you are performing vital tasks or exercising to keep warm. Maintain a calm, positive attitude. Be prepared to signal rescuers at all times.

If it's HOT outside Reduce heat gain: get out of the sun and off the hot ground. Reduce heat gain: get out of the sun and off the hot ground. Protect your body with light-colored, loose-fitting clothing. Pay special attention to the head and neck. Wet your clothing if water is abundant. Don't move around during the heat of the day. Drink your water! If water is plentiful, force yourself to drink until your pee is "clear." Clear urine means your body is fully hydrated. Get familiar with your area early and "make camp" before it gets dark, even if you plan on moving during the night when it's cooler. Rest and conserve your energy. Maintain a calm, positive attitude. Be prepared to signal rescuers at all times.

The Gotta-Have-It Stuff The survival-kit components described in this book are listed on the next page for your convenience. Whether you carry these items or a hybrid of your own creation, a bare-bones kit for dealing with a short-term survival scenario must contain the following ideas. Don't get caught up in the specifics like a certain brand or type of knife. Think instead about the general qualities the cutting-edge (knife) has and make sure it effectively meshes with your overall needs, environment, and skill level. Aside from clothing, water, signaling devices, and a "Party On" attitude, the following ideas are not presented in any set-in-stone order because the order will be dictated by your particular scenario.

Must-Have Concepts for a Short-Term Survival Kit Adequate means to regulate body temperature for your environment (clothing). Adequate means to regulate body temperature for your environment (clothing). Adequate means to create potable water to regulate body temperature for your environment. Multiple, effective means for signaling for rescue. (Signal mirrors don't work on cloudy days or at night.) A "Party On" attitude. A cutting edge. Methods to create and sustain fire. Cordage (string or rope). The determined willingness and know-how to use what you have to its fullest potential.

Survival Kit Components in Cody's Kit Two heavy-duty freezer bags. Two heavy-duty freezer bags. Tincture of iodine 2%. One condom (non-lubricated). Regular s.p.a.ce blanket. One roll of dental floss. Colored surveyor's tape. Pea-less, brightly colored plastic whistle. Paraffin-coated, strike-anywhere kitchen matches in a brightly colored match safe. Disposable butane lighter. Magnesium block fire starter with hacksaw-blade striker. Six to eight cotton b.a.l.l.s saturated with petroleum jelly in brightly colored film vial. Credit-card-sized magnifying lens in a brightly colored sheath. Flashlight and lanyard with two AA batteries. Two spare AA batteries with date of purchase. Extra carbon-steel knife with sheath. Clear plastic drinking tube. Collapsible, 1- to 2-gallon water container. Two 55-gallon barrel liners or three large-capacity leaf bags. Heavy-duty s.p.a.ce blanket. Wool or synthetic stocking cap. Cotton bandana. 100 feet of 550-pound-test parachute cord. 3 x 5-inch glass, sightable signal mirror with brightly colored, duct-tape-reinforced pouch. Homemade first-aid kit. Uncle Peppy's patented power pack stack. 7.5-minute topographical map and compass. Two candy or nutrition bars.

NOTE: Other items can be added to customize your survival necklace such as an LED light, small compass, metal match, and so forth.

Choosing the Right Instructor Many "survival instructors" can be found on the Internet, in print, and elsewhere. Most probably have good intentions, while others see an opportunity for extra income due to the increasing popularity of self-sufficiency training. It's important that you choose your instructors wisely. It's important that you choose your instructors wisely. The advice you take dealing with the safety and lives of you and your loved ones should come from a very knowledgeable source. You're learning skills that could save your life-you're not buying a toaster oven. Regardless of an outdoor school's apparent size and media appeal, the number-one variable into the quality of their program is the quality of their instructors. The advice you take dealing with the safety and lives of you and your loved ones should come from a very knowledgeable source. You're learning skills that could save your life-you're not buying a toaster oven. Regardless of an outdoor school's apparent size and media appeal, the number-one variable into the quality of their program is the quality of their instructors.

The following are tips to help you choose a good instructor whether you're looking for skills in outdoor survival, primitive living, or home preparedness. Remember, any school is only as good as its instructors. Remember, any school is only as good as its instructors.

1. Ask to see the instructor's resume. Ask to see the instructor's resume. Has your potential instructor been teaching for ten years or ten weeks? In general, self-reliance skills require many years of training and practice before proficiency can be obtained. Ask to see if the instructor has been teaching skills continuously during their self-proclaimed years of operation. It's not uncommon for someone's "30 years of experience" to include the 20 years in the 1970s and '80s when they operated a full-time bug-extermination company. Has your potential instructor been teaching for ten years or ten weeks? In general, self-reliance skills require many years of training and practice before proficiency can be obtained. Ask to see if the instructor has been teaching skills continuously during their self-proclaimed years of operation. It's not uncommon for someone's "30 years of experience" to include the 20 years in the 1970s and '80s when they operated a full-time bug-extermination company.2. Train from someone who teaches survival skills full time if possible. Train from someone who teaches survival skills full time if possible. Would you feel comfortable seeing a physician who practiced medicine three months out of the year? Large schools with dozens of instructors have the impossible task of attempting to keep them employed full time. Since finding year-round work in this business can be challenging, locating an instructor that fits this category will tell you something about them-that they are either very good, very lucky, or both. Would you feel comfortable seeing a physician who practiced medicine three months out of the year? Large schools with dozens of instructors have the impossible task of attempting to keep them employed full time. Since finding year-round work in this business can be challenging, locating an instructor that fits this category will tell you something about them-that they are either very good, very lucky, or both.3. If your primary interest is primitive-living skills, train from someone who lives in your geographic region. If your primary interest is primitive-living skills, train from someone who lives in your geographic region. They will be the most familiar with your local flora and fauna. Learning to harvest cactus fruit from an Eskimo is sketchy at best. If quality concerns you, the longer dedicated instructors have lived within the geographic areas they teach, the greater experience they'll be able to pass on to you. They will be the most familiar with your local flora and fauna. Learning to harvest cactus fruit from an Eskimo is sketchy at best. If quality concerns you, the longer dedicated instructors have lived within the geographic areas they teach, the greater experience they'll be able to pass on to you.4. Ask around about the instructor's background. Ask around about the instructor's background. Are they known and respected by their peers? Are they in the trenches teaching or just a figurehead for their organization? These days, unfortunately, the school with the best Web-page designer and brochure is thought to be the best wilderness school as well. Are they known and respected by their peers? Are they in the trenches teaching or just a figurehead for their organization? These days, unfortunately, the school with the best Web-page designer and brochure is thought to be the best wilderness school as well.5. Beware the "expert" as nature is too full of variables to support this type of personality. Beware the "expert" as nature is too full of variables to support this type of personality. Large egos and c.o.c.ky attitudes are all too common in the field of wilderness survival. One of the more unfortunate manifestations of this mindset is the failure to be open to learning new material. Any instructor who tells you there is only one way to do a skill is destined to be upstaged by a humble student who has no preconceived bias as to how that skill is done. Large egos and c.o.c.ky attitudes are all too common in the field of wilderness survival. One of the more unfortunate manifestations of this mindset is the failure to be open to learning new material. Any instructor who tells you there is only one way to do a skill is destined to be upstaged by a humble student who has no preconceived bias as to how that skill is done.6. If your interest in learning survival skills runs deeper than experiencing a cool "Eco-vacation," study with someone who knows primitive-living skills and modern-survival skills. If your interest in learning survival skills runs deeper than experiencing a cool "Eco-vacation," study with someone who knows primitive-living skills and modern-survival skills. Most outdoor schools confuse "modern-survival skills" with "primitive-living skills." Although there is overlap between the two, learning to flint knap a stone knife has limited value for your 59-year-old aunt if she's thrust into a wilderness survival situation. Ultimately, and when taught in the proper order, knowing both sets of skills gives you greater potential for success when dealing with a survival scenario. When the chips are down, a bow drill is no substitute for matches and the know-how to use them. Most outdoor schools confuse "modern-survival skills" with "primitive-living skills." Although there is overlap between the two, learning to flint knap a stone knife has limited value for your 59-year-old aunt if she's thrust into a wilderness survival situation. Ultimately, and when taught in the proper order, knowing both sets of skills gives you greater potential for success when dealing with a survival scenario. When the chips are down, a bow drill is no substitute for matches and the know-how to use them.7. Before attending a hands-on course, make sure the student-to-qualified-instructor ratio is low. Before attending a hands-on course, make sure the student-to-qualified-instructor ratio is low. Unless you're getting a price break, hands-on instruction involving more than ten or twelve students will cause the course quality to suffer because you'll spend more time watching than doing. I specify "qualified" instructors, as large schools often have a heavy instructor turnover rate, and therefore rely on "interns" (future instructors working for free to gain experience). It should go without saying that interns have not yet achieved the field experience and knowledge base of a core, lead instructor. Unless you're getting a price break, hands-on instruction involving more than ten or twelve students will cause the course quality to suffer because you'll spend more time watching than doing. I specify "qualified" instructors, as large schools often have a heavy instructor turnover rate, and therefore rely on "interns" (future instructors working for free to gain experience). It should go without saying that interns have not yet achieved the field experience and knowledge base of a core, lead instructor.8. Is the field course you're thinking about taking really taught in the field or just "outside"? Is the field course you're thinking about taking really taught in the field or just "outside"? Training responsibly in a small group allows you to harvest materials directly from the wilderness for maximum learning and enjoyment. A course that supplies all your raw materials could just as easily be taught in a grocery-store parking lot. Training responsibly in a small group allows you to harvest materials directly from the wilderness for maximum learning and enjoyment. A course that supplies all your raw materials could just as easily be taught in a grocery-store parking lot.9. You get what you pay for. You get what you pay for. If you ever need to use your skills, you'll find them to be priceless. If you ever need to use your skills, you'll find them to be priceless.

Happy Training!!





CHAPTER DISCUSSION