Report
Please switch to other image servers if images don't load. If still doesn't work, report error to us to fix it.
Server 1 Server 2 Server 3

Dramatis Personae for Ilium ACHAEANS (Greeks)

Achilles son of Peleus and the Goddess Thetis, most ferocious of the Achaean heroes, fated at birth to die young by Hector's hand at Troy and receive glory forever, or to live a long life in obscurity. son of Peleus and the Goddess Thetis, most ferocious of the Achaean heroes, fated at birth to die young by Hector's hand at Troy and receive glory forever, or to live a long life in obscurity.

Odysseus son of Laertes, lord of Ithaca, husband of Penelope, crafty strategist, a favorite of the Goddess Athena son of Laertes, lord of Ithaca, husband of Penelope, crafty strategist, a favorite of the Goddess Athena Agamemnon son of Atreus, supreme commander of the Achaeans, husband of Clytemnestra. It is Agamemnon's insistence on seizing Achilles' slave girl, Briseis, that precipitates the central crisis of the son of Atreus, supreme commander of the Achaeans, husband of Clytemnestra. It is Agamemnon's insistence on seizing Achilles' slave girl, Briseis, that precipitates the central crisis of the Iliad Iliad.

Menelaus younger son of Atreus, brother of Agamemnon, husband to Helen younger son of Atreus, brother of Agamemnon, husband to Helen Diomedes son of Tydeus, captain of the Achaeans, and such a ferocious warrior that he receives son of Tydeus, captain of the Achaeans, and such a ferocious warrior that he receives aristeia aristeia (a tale within the tale showing individual valor in battle) in the (a tale within the tale showing individual valor in battle) in the Iliad Iliad, second only to Achilles' final wrath Patroclus son of Menoetus, best friend to Achilles, destined to die by Hector's hand in the son of Menoetus, best friend to Achilles, destined to die by Hector's hand in the Iliad Iliad Nestor son of Neleus and the oldest of the Achaean captains, "the clear speaker of Pylos," given to long-winded rants in council son of Neleus and the oldest of the Achaean captains, "the clear speaker of Pylos," given to long-winded rants in council Phoenix son of Amyntor, older tutor and longtime comrade of Achilles, who inexplicably has a central role in the important "embassy to Achilles" son of Amyntor, older tutor and longtime comrade of Achilles, who inexplicably has a central role in the important "embassy to Achilles"

TROJANS (defenders of Ilium)



Hector son of Priam, leader and greatest hero of the Trojans, husband to Andromache and father to the toddler Astyanax (the child also known as "Scamandrius" and "Lord of the City" to the citizens of Ilium) son of Priam, leader and greatest hero of the Trojans, husband to Andromache and father to the toddler Astyanax (the child also known as "Scamandrius" and "Lord of the City" to the citizens of Ilium) Andromache wife of Hector, mother of Astyanax; Andromache's royal father and brothers were slain by Achilles wife of Hector, mother of Astyanax; Andromache's royal father and brothers were slain by Achilles Priam son of Laomedon, elder king of Ilium (Troy), father of Hector and Paris and many other sons son of Laomedon, elder king of Ilium (Troy), father of Hector and Paris and many other sons Paris son of Priam, brother of Hector, gifted as both fighter and lover; it is Paris who brought about the Trojan War by abducting Helen, Menelaus' wife, from Sparta and bringing her to Ilium son of Priam, brother of Hector, gifted as both fighter and lover; it is Paris who brought about the Trojan War by abducting Helen, Menelaus' wife, from Sparta and bringing her to Ilium Helen wife of Meneleus, daughter of Zeus, victim of multiple abductions because of her fabled beauty wife of Meneleus, daughter of Zeus, victim of multiple abductions because of her fabled beauty Hecuba Priam's wife, queen of Troy Priam's wife, queen of Troy Aeneas son of Anchises and Aphrodite, leader of the Dardanians, destined in the son of Anchises and Aphrodite, leader of the Dardanians, destined in the Iliad Iliad to be the future king of the scattered Trojans to be the future king of the scattered Trojans Cassandra daughter of Priam, rape victim, tortured clairvoyant daughter of Priam, rape victim, tortured clairvoyant

GodS ON OLYMPOS.

Zeus king of the Gods, husband and brother to Hera, father to countless Olympians and mortals, son of Kronos and Rhea-the titans whom he overthrew and cast down into Tartarus, the lowest circles of the world of the dead king of the Gods, husband and brother to Hera, father to countless Olympians and mortals, son of Kronos and Rhea-the titans whom he overthrew and cast down into Tartarus, the lowest circles of the world of the dead Hera wife and sister of Zeus, champion of the Achaeans wife and sister of Zeus, champion of the Achaeans Athena daughter of Zeus, strong defender of the Achaeans daughter of Zeus, strong defender of the Achaeans Ares God of war, a hothead, ally of the Trojans God of war, a hothead, ally of the Trojans Apollo God of the arts, healing, and disease-"lord of the silver bow"-and prime ally of the Trojans God of the arts, healing, and disease-"lord of the silver bow"-and prime ally of the Trojans Aphrodite Goddess of love, ally of the Trojans, a schemer Goddess of love, ally of the Trojans, a schemer Hephaestus God of fire, artificer and engineer to the Gods, son of Hera; lusts after Athena God of fire, artificer and engineer to the Gods, son of Hera; lusts after Athena

OLD STYLE HUMANS.

Ada a few years past her First Twenty, mistress of Ardis Hall a few years past her First Twenty, mistress of Ardis Hall Harman ninety-nine years old and thus one year away from his Final Twenty; the only man on Earth who knows how to read ninety-nine years old and thus one year away from his Final Twenty; the only man on Earth who knows how to read Daeman approaching his Second Twenty, a pudgy seducer of women and a collector of b.u.t.terflies approaching his Second Twenty, a pudgy seducer of women and a collector of b.u.t.terflies Savi the Wandering Jew, the only old-style human not gathered up in the final fax 1,400 years earlier the Wandering Jew, the only old-style human not gathered up in the final fax 1,400 years earlier

MORAVECS*

(*autonomous, sentient, biomechanical organisms seeded throughout the outer solar system by humans during the Lost Age)

Mahnmut explorer under the ice-capped seas of Jupiter's moon Europa; skipper of explorer under the ice-capped seas of Jupiter's moon Europa; skipper of The Dark Lady The Dark Lady submersible; amateur scholar of Shakespeare's sonnets submersible; amateur scholar of Shakespeare's sonnets Orphu of Io eight-ton, six-meter-long, crab-shaped, heavily armored hard-vac moravec who works in the sulfur-torus of Io; Proust enthusiast eight-ton, six-meter-long, crab-shaped, heavily armored hard-vac moravec who works in the sulfur-torus of Io; Proust enthusiast Asteague/Che Europan, prime integrator of the Five Moons Consortium Europan, prime integrator of the Five Moons Consortium Koros III Ganymedan, buckycarbon-sheathed, humanoid in design, fly's eyes, commander of the Mars expedition Ganymedan, buckycarbon-sheathed, humanoid in design, fly's eyes, commander of the Mars expedition Ri Po Callistan, non-humanoid in design, ship's navigator Callistan, non-humanoid in design, ship's navigator Centurion Leader Mep Ahoo Rockvec soldier from the Asteroid Belt Rockvec soldier from the Asteroid Belt

OTHER ENtitIES.

Voynix mysterious bipedal creatures, part servants, part watchdogs, not of Earth mysterious bipedal creatures, part servants, part watchdogs, not of Earth LGM.

Little Green Men, also known as Little Green Men, also known as zeks zeks; chlorophyll-based workers on Mars, tasked with erecting thousands of Great Stone Heads Prospero avatar of the evolved and self-aware Earth logosphere avatar of the evolved and self-aware Earth logosphere Ariel avatar of the evolved and self-aware Earth biosphere avatar of the evolved and self-aware Earth biosphere Caliban Prospero's pet monster Prospero's pet monster calibani lesser clones of Caliban, guardians of the Mediterranean Basin lesser clones of Caliban, guardians of the Mediterranean Basin Sycorax a witch, Caliban's mother; according to Prospero, she is also known as Circe a witch, Caliban's mother; according to Prospero, she is also known as Circe Setebos Caliban's violent, arbitrary God, the "many-handed as a cuttlefish," not from Earth's solar system Caliban's violent, arbitrary God, the "many-handed as a cuttlefish," not from Earth's solar system The Quiet Prospero's God (maybe), Setebos' nemesis, an unknown entity Prospero's God (maybe), Setebos' nemesis, an unknown entity

Acknowledgments.

While many translations of the Iliad Iliad were referred to in preparation for the writing of this novel, I would specifically like to acknowledge the following translators-Robert f.a.gles, Richmond Lattimore, Alexander Pope, George Chapman, Robert Fitzgerald, and Allen Mandelbaum. The beauty of their translations is manifold and their talent is beyond this writer's comprehension. were referred to in preparation for the writing of this novel, I would specifically like to acknowledge the following translators-Robert f.a.gles, Richmond Lattimore, Alexander Pope, George Chapman, Robert Fitzgerald, and Allen Mandelbaum. The beauty of their translations is manifold and their talent is beyond this writer's comprehension.

For ancillary poetry or imaginative Iliad Iliad-related prose which helped shape this volume, I would especially like to acknowledge the work of W. H. Auden, Robert Browning, Robert Graves, Christopher Logue, Robert Lowell, and Alfred, Lord Tennyson.

For research and commentary on the Iliad Iliad and Homer, I would like to acknowledge the work of Bernard Knox, Richmond Lattimore, Malcolm M. Willc.o.c.k, A.J.B. Wace, F. H. Stubbings, C. Kerenyi, and members of the Homeric and Homer, I would like to acknowledge the work of Bernard Knox, Richmond Lattimore, Malcolm M. Willc.o.c.k, A.J.B. Wace, F. H. Stubbings, C. Kerenyi, and members of the Homeric scholia scholia too numerous to mention. too numerous to mention.

For insightful commentary on Shakespeare and Browning's "Caliban upon Setebos," I gratefully acknowledge the writings of Harold Bloom, W. H. Auden, and the editors of the Norton Anthology of English Literature. Norton Anthology of English Literature. For an insight into Auden's interpretation of "Caliban upon Setebos" and other aspects of Caliban, I refer readers to Edward Mendelson's For an insight into Auden's interpretation of "Caliban upon Setebos" and other aspects of Caliban, I refer readers to Edward Mendelson's Later Auden. Later Auden.

"Mahnmut's" insights into the sonnets of Shakespeare were largely guided by Helen Vendler's wonderful The Art of Shakespeare's Sonnets The Art of Shakespeare's Sonnets.

Many of "Orphu of Io's" comments on the work of Marcel Proust were inspired by Roger Shattuck's Proust's Way: A Field Guide to Proust's Way: A Field Guide to In Search of Lost Time. In Search of Lost Time.

To readers interested in emulating Mahnmut's Bardolotous love of Shakespeare, I would recommend Harold Bloom's Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human, Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human, Herman Gollob's Herman Gollob's Me and Shakespeare: Adventures with the Bard, Me and Shakespeare: Adventures with the Bard, and and Shakespeare: A Life Shakespeare: A Life by Park Honan by Park Honan.

For detailed maps of Mars (before the terraforming), I owe a great debt of gratitude to NASA, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Uncovering the Secrets of the Red Planet, Uncovering the Secrets of the Red Planet, published by the National Geographic Society, edited by Paul Raeburn, with forward and commentary by Matt Golombeck. published by the National Geographic Society, edited by Paul Raeburn, with forward and commentary by Matt Golombeck. Scientific American Scientific American has been a rich source of detail, and acknowledgment should go to such articles as "The Hidden Ocean of Europa," by Robert T. Pappalardo, James W. Head, and Ronald Greeley (October 1999), "Quantum Teleportation" by Anton Zeilinger (April 2000), and "How to Build a Time Machine" by Paul Davies (September 2002). has been a rich source of detail, and acknowledgment should go to such articles as "The Hidden Ocean of Europa," by Robert T. Pappalardo, James W. Head, and Ronald Greeley (October 1999), "Quantum Teleportation" by Anton Zeilinger (April 2000), and "How to Build a Time Machine" by Paul Davies (September 2002).

Finally, my thanks to Clee Richeson for details on how to build a homemade casting furnace with a wooden cupola.

About the Author.

Dan Simmons is the Hugo Award-winning author of Hyperion Hyperion and T and The Fall of Hyperion and their sequels, and their sequels, Endymion Endymion and and The Rise of Endymion The Rise of Endymion. He has written the critically acclaimed suspense novels Darwin's Blade Darwin's Blade and and The Crook Factory The Crook Factory, as well as other highly respected works including Summer of Night Summer of Night, its sequel A Winter Haunting A Winter Haunting, and Song of Kali Song of Kali, Carrion Comfort Carrion Comfort, and World's Enough & Time World's Enough & Time. Simmons makes his home in Colorado.

Visit www.AuthorTracker.com for exclusive information on your favorite HarperCollins author.

By Dan Simmons

Song of Kali

Phases of Gravity

Carrion Comfort

Hyperion

The Fall of Hyperion

Prayers to Broken Stones

Summer of Night

The Hollow Man

Children of the Night

Summer Sketches

Lovedeath

Fires of Eden

Endymion

The Rise of Endymion

The Crook Factory

Darwin's Blade

A Winter Haunting

Hardcase

Hard Freeze

Worlds Enough & Time





CHAPTER DISCUSSION